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the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
on public television in america and also around the globe. it is an announcement many have been waiting for. today's news that the duchess of cambridge is expecting a child was greeted with delight and concern. from around the world, congratulations have been pouring in for the royal couple, including well wishes from the white house. the 30-year-old duchess is suffering from severe morning sickness. she has been hospitalized for several days. our royal correspondent starts our coverage. >> departing from hospital this evening, the father to be. william had spent several hours with his wife. they had driven to london earlier together. it was earlier this week and that the sickness started. certainly no sign of anything last friday when kate was playing hockey in high heels. nor had there been any hint of what was the county -- was to come a couple of days earlier. william was presented with a baby gift. doctors say severe sickness that such an early stage should not be a cause for early concerned -- because of concern -- be a cause of concern. >> it is a difficult time for them to be going
enemy america has -- at is our first president, george washington. >> i think george washington said this when he was up in massachusetts in the beginning of december 1775 or maybe late november. communications were slow in these days. washington, in the point in time, probably the most recent things he knew about done more -- about dunmore was probably as close to the peak of his power in virginia because ultimately he was chased out of virginia. but during the summer and fall of 1775, he was very effective in sending out troops to read plantations. -- to read plantations. he was during of the indians. they could find refuge and get the fleet of the british army. even stirred up the instruction of indentured servants. not only did look like he might succeed, but there were rumors that he would ascend the party in the area of alexandria, va irginia. george washington is up there in massachusetts were about his wife. even thomas jefferson were about his wife at the same time. and i put that in. i did not dwell on it. i think it is a footnote or something like that. but washington had
visit booktv.org. >> author jon meacham recount it is career of america's third president d recounts the career of america's third president, thomas jefferson. he reports that despite his strong beliefs and opposition to confrontation, president jefferson was able so successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennesse
was afraid if they could not hold america, the dominoes will fall elsewhere in the british empire. he was wrong about that and he was wrong about a lot. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. but to blame it all on him would be a great mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and therefore the declaration of independence? >> that is all this stuff about george iii being an ogre and being responsible for everything. that was dressed up for very good reason. if you were urging a revolution, and by political theory of the era, you could overthrow a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant was ok, it was not a civil war. it was something that had greater justification. in order to make the case they needed heading into the period of wanting to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempe
countries is stamped "made in america" and that's something to be proud of. something to be proud of. [cheers and applause] by the way, i hope the camera folks had a chance to take a look at some of the connects including that flag made out of connects and joe biden was in costco, he wanted to buy some of this stuff but i told him he had too much work to do. i wasn't going to have him building rollercoasters all day long. of course, santa delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. so you should keep your eye on who gets some connects this year. they're going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it's been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end and obviously i couldn't be more honored to be back in the white house, but i'm already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. >> we love you! >> i love you back. [cheers and applause] the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it g
successful at cost control and private insurers have been, the great thing about america is we have everything, all possible assistance here. the veterans health administration which is true socialized medicine, the doctors are government employees, is incredibly efficient relative to the rest of the health-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signa
not hold america, the dominoes will fall in the rest of the british empire. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. to blame it all on him would be a mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and then the declaration of independence? >> all that stuff about george iii being an ogre and responsible for everything, if your urging a revolution, by political theory, you could overthrow retired. -- a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant would be a good thing. in order to make the case they needed heading into wanting to be credible to the other nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he wasn't famous until he was famous in the sense that we know his
. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually rarely put pen to paper himself. so what is the significance of this typewriter you have in the exhi business. >> are you absolutely write. churchill favorite method of working was by dictation. and this is what was then a state of the art silence typewrite
the coast of maine, remote and solitary, held special meaning for one of america's greatest artists. in a letter to his brother, winslow homer said of his surroundings, "there is certainly some strange power "that has an overlook on me, directing my life. "that i am in the right place, there is no doubt. "i have found something interesting to work at and time to do it." for almost three decades, winslow homer made his home on prouts neck, a rocky point just south of portland, maine. his house still stands on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting thelace where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who co
's go where we have good labor relations in the united states of america -- the wages are reasonable. >> greta: are the big companies, though, are they the one who is are union busting? if they are only going to go to those states and put some governors up against the wall, in order to compete -- >> sure. they are going to get the best deal. here's where i agree with the union guys. nafta, gatt, they are magna carta for transcontinental corporations to shut down the united states, where they have high wages and the high regulations and move it over to china, cut your wage rate by 80%, produce there, bring the products back into the united states and then the huge new profits you make, share those with your shareholders and the executives. and that's where i disagree this globalization, free trade. they have really been unfair. one place i agree with hoffa. he was with me in the 90s. they are bringing mexican trucks into the united states, driving them on american highways, mexican drivers into rounder-cut american teamsters. i think that's wrong. i think the teamsters -- >> greta: ye
cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. >>teve: this is probably going to bug you, people of afghanistan are supposed to be allies, right. >> brian: not according to their president karzai. listen. >> policies coming to us from terrorism and the taliban. it is partly coming to us from the structures that nato and traded in afghanistan. >> brian: our time and mon yesacrifices are a waste? >> steve: joining us is the army veteran for america. good morning to you. president karzai is blaming united states and nato for violence and corruption in afghanistan. he sounds a little >> yes, it is a nice posen pill to look at. i was in a
. stuart: a question for you. >> go ahead. stuart: in america we say you have goose bumps when you're very cold. in england we say you're hen-fleshed. are you either this morning? >> i am both, put together. times a hundred. stuart: excellent. >> i look like rudolph with my nose. stuart: may i recommend you wear a hat and i'm losing my hair and-- >> i do, i have a hat with me as well as ear warmers just not for this hit. can i tell you some things going on behind me today? >> no, don't have time, sorry. that's the way it is. >> i was going to tell you about the drunken revellers and their bathroom experiences, i guess you don't want to know. stuart: you should hear what they're saying, no more drunken revellers, no time. wrap up, keep warm, young lady, i mean it. >> thank you very much happy new year to you. stuart: happy new year to you, lauren. and on thursday, president obama signed an executive order that ends a pay freeze for congress and federal workers that is. as our march this coming here, federal employees will see 1/2% to 1% pay increase and get this, 535 members of congress wil
marzullo, abc7 news. >>> stay with abc news and "good morning america" lara spencer is in london she will have a live report at 7:00. >>> 6:36. traffic and weather together, next. live look outside, you are looking at san mateo bridge traffic zipping along without trouble. dry out there now except for a few sprinkles up north. mike will have the full forecast. sue is checking traffic. >>> painkillers taken from a peninsula drugstore. the similarities this case has to another >>> welcome back. live doppler 7 hd showing you the last three hours and how radar returns are more plentiful the farther west you go. it is looking out 100 miles out watching this wall of lighter rain towards bodega bay, santa rosa, guerneville over the next two to three hours. visibilities fairly unlimited for the rest of us, cloudy, best chance of rain steady rain north bay during the afternoon, 50s, the rest of us mostly cloudy, scattered sprinkle and low to mid 60s. have the wet weather gear up north. >>> muni metro back on schedule after power problems overnight that's the good news. bart says they are on t
. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." in this half hour, michigan is really doing it. the statehouse just passed a bill to make that union stronghold a right-to-work state. we are about to talk to governor rick snider object it. . >>> and has a recession already started? believe it or not, that's the forecast of lakshman achuthan. he says it started in july. we're going to press him on all that. >>> now, a movement started by american majority action called fire boehner has been trending on twitter. . but there's really not one wit of serious evidence that mr. boehner has any problems holding on to his speakership or even conservative leaders in the house. here now to try to make this weak case is ron meyer. ron, first of all, i want to say that i commend john boehner for his valiant attempts to stop the fiscal cliff and to make a deal without giving up growth principles. but when y
just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and then i get up to 15% cash back... put into my account! i know, right? [ male announcer ] introducinbankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. >> gretchen: 16 minutes after the top of the hour. if you are just waking up. it is usually a symbol of pride and patriotism. but the new flag polls seen in iran have a sinister meaning. the flag poles are electronic attenas used to jam communication and block their citizens from getting internet tv and radio signals. why? here with more is disa. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> gretchen: you have inside sources in the country of iran, why would they wanting to fool their citizens as to the real mission of the flag poles. >> the biggest threat to the regime since 2009 when the iranian government was caught off guard and saw the large presence on the internet and getting information from outside of the country and sending information from inside out. it was the twitter rev -- revolution. they were using youtube
areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of deal. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. you're watching "starting point." republicans have come out with their version of what a fiscal cliff solution
approval. very different and just the same as america's favorite fish dinner. >> same texture. >> eating frankenfish. >> please don't use that term. >> reporter: the fda won't say when it will give final approval. the company says it could go out of business before it does. jim avila, abc news, washington. >> and they'll run out of money soon, in january of next year. >> a month. >> a matter of weeks from now too. the fda taking its time in getting to the issue. i think most people are at home going ew. >> i don't have a problem necessarily with steroid being injected into the chicken to make them larger. there's a reason that animals were created and supposed to stay exactly how they are. no cross-pollination here. interesting, little chance a salmon could escape and breed. if that happens, bred with wild fish they could disrupt everything. but there's -- >>> if the frankenfish got together with other fish. freaky fish! >> chaos. a freak every now and then. i knew willis would enjoy that. >>> still to come, getting ready for the end of the world. >>> as the countdown to the end of the m
or the united states of america. mr. speaker, more jobs means that the impact of the weaker than forecast gdp on the public finances have been less than some might have expected. there have been three developments that have each had a significant one-off impact on the public finances, and in the report today we publish clearly and transparently the impacts of all three. first, there is the transfer of the royal mail pension fund to the public sector at part of its privatization. this produces a one-off reduction in the deficit of 28 billion pounds this year, but it adds to the deficit in the years afterwards. second, the previous goth had class -- government had classified northern rock asset management as off balance sheet. today it is brought on balance sheet in line with the office of national statistics. this adds about 70 billion pounds to our national debt and reminds us of the price the country is still paying for the failures of the past. third, the government as decided -- has decided, third, the government has decided with the agreement of the bank of england to transfer excess cash
this morning." ñp that ended america's most infamous family feud. the hat fooelds and the mccoys. researchers have now found the first physical remains of the final battle. mark strassmann has the exclusive look of the evidence that could rewrite the history of these hillbilly clans. >> reporter: in these east kentucky hills bob scott's family has owned this land, almost 50 acres, since 1902. it was a stage for a bloody chapter in american history that's also part of his family history, the hatfield/mccoy feud. >> my mother's maiden name was hatfield. >> and this is mccoy property. >> randall mccoy, pate trat of the kentucky clan once lived here and his well sit here's on scott's land. his once enemy was hatfield, leader of the clan. this spot is where they finally ended a generation of fussin', fightin', and killing. sparked by a murder right after the civil war. >> mccoy's brother was a northern soldier. he comes back from the war. hatfield and his family fought for the south. word gout out they were out to get him and they eventually went out and get him. >> reporter: between 1865 and 1868
comes back to us is the substituted compliance, as strict in london as it is in america? it's unusual that the crisis happens in london. mr. cooper, would you like to comment on it? and i will say in basel iii we're hearing from some of our financial institution that is the capital requirements are more onerous on american banks because american regulate, are going to enforce them and many competitors feel they will not enforce it. so this is a problem if someone can go, to another, have a different standard in what is competitive global market in the case of capital requirement requirements. have a situation that is disadvantage to american firms. i'm concerned about the threat to american taxpayers. you can say you have substituted compliance but how are you enforcing the substituted compliance? you hear from some financial institutions, won't say it publicly but don't feel it is regulated in certain places and i'm wondering is london one of them. why are so many financial crises in london? i would like to here from mr. cook. >> i think that will be a very important situation if sub
guest: we were in the war. whether clutch came or not america was rages against the japanese, not the germans. the first week pearl harbor. then hitler made the decision to declare war on the united states when he didn't have to and that, churchill realized, meant the end for hitler if the americans went to europe first. the policy of germany first then japan had to be worked out. which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans always liked churchill. he had been speaking in america for 20 years. was american. guest: his mother was american. he was well known on the lecture circuit and now here he is as prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing he had an ally and americans took a liking to him because they were very wary of churchill that all he wanted were his colonies become. b not liberty or not roosevelt's four freedoms but to recapture everything the japanese had taken from him by using american boys and that americans resented and they were wary of that host: we are about out of time. when di
that he was here had an impact. we were in the war whether churchill came are not keeping america was a raging against the japanese. not the germans. then hitler made the dunderheaded decision to declare war on the united states when he did not have to. churchill realized what that would mean if the americans looked to your first. the policy of germany first, then japan had be worked out, which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans like to churchill. >> his mom was american. >> his mom was american. he was well-known on the lecture circuit. now here he is prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing americans took a liking to him because they were very wary -- and still were many -- that all they wanted were the colonies back. not liberty. not war freedoms. to recapture everything the japanese had taken from them by using american boys. and that americans resented. they were wary of that. as well as george marshall. >> we are about out of time. when did you finish this? >> this is about -- early this ye
months. america's gift headquarters. walmart. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. inspiration. great power. iconic design. exhilarating performance. [ race announcer ] audi once again has created le mans history! [ male announcer ] and once in a great while... all of the above. take your seat in the incomparable audi a8. take advantage of exceptional values on the audi a8 during the season of audi event. ♪ >>> time for some sports now. peyton manning and the broncos looking for their eighth straight win last night against the raiders. first quarter in oakland, peyton manning drops back and connects with joel dreessen for the score. broncos take an early 7-0 lead. raiders down by nine in the third quarter. carson palmer trying to convert
. >>> 7:23. where is the smartest city in north america? one website says san francisco is the second smartest city. san francisco has a lining entrepreneurial economy -- this rhining entrepreneur economy, the report says, but they say it is near colleges and universities. behind san francisco are seattle and vancouver. >>> 7:23. we want to check in with sal. see what's happening on the roads. sal? >> yeah. boston has harvard. >> right. >> let's take a look at what we have. it's cambridge, technically. but you know what i mean. southbound 880, we have slow traffic. we also have slow traffic on the bridges. but not so much on the san mateo bridge as we did yesterday. we want to talk about contra costa county because highway 4 has improved from antioch to pittsburg but slow in bay point. 24 is not that bad. it's crowded, though. and thin 80 westbound in western contra costa county slow in richmond as you drive down to berkeley. if you are driving in san jose, we have slow traffic here coming up from downtown. it's very slow driving up to the 17 interchange and beyond that into cupertino
can go back to sleep in america. i wanted to tuck people back in. >> is jack jacobs on the phone? let's take a pause. >> i put colonel jacobs back to sleep. >> no one can put colonel jacobs to sleep. he's hyperactive. as we indicated earlier in the show, a long-time friend, sometimes under ling of general norm an schwartzkopf. colonel jacobs, i was mentioning at the top of the show that the impact that general schwartzkopf, then colonel schwartzkopf had on me from an incident in vietnam that a woman in iowa, peg mullen, wrote about in a book called the "friendly fire" about the death of her son a young army private. general schwartzkopf was the army commander and he was so human and approachable to mrs. mullen. it was impressive. clearly he was an impressive guy. tell us your thoughts and memories of general sworts co h schwartzkopf. >> he was an impressive guy. i he met him when i whe was a mr and i was a lieutenant. i had an unpleasant experience with him during which i was trying to exercise my authority and responsibility. he is a higher ranking guy telling me, no, i he wasn't go
of america's most famous modern generals. and more claims and successes who were involved in messier campaigns. he was himself the son of an army general, was a decorated vietnam veteran and commanded u.s. ground forces in the 1983. he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, was treated then campaigned to raise awareness of the disease. >> that's nick charles reporting there on stormen norman who died at age 78. this year has seen the arrival of a whole wave of films which are geared towards older audiences, one. films with older characters have been doing well around the world, especially in britain and the u.s., as tom brook reports from new york. >> it's a trend, old people in movies. next month there's a film called "quartet" set in a retirement home starring several british actors. meryl streep and tommy lee jones both succeeded in "hope springs" in what's being called a mid life romantic comedy. then, there was the best exotic mari gs gold hotel. it's been very profitable. the cost is $10 million to make and it's taken many more than $130 million around the world. the film was seen
between america, i think, and really growth is having a long-term fiscal plan. what i would like to see, and i really like bob corker, he is a great guy, he's the kind of person we need in the u.s. senate, but i'd like to see some of these cuts locked in now, and i'd like to see some of this entitlement reform locked in today. i don't want to see all of that wait for six weeks. >> hmm. what's the right level for dividends and capital gains, do you think? should they be lower than ordinary income? >> look, i think what you will see is i think they'll both probably go to 20% would be my guess. i don't think you'll see dive dinds go back to ordinary income rates. >> is that okay? >> that's part of bowles-simpson or simpson-bowles, put it back at ordinary rates. what's ordinary rates coming down to? >> we brought ordinary rates down to 23%. you know, that's a horse of a different color. ordinary rates are going to be -- >> is it 23 or 28? that's another thing we always hear. >> well, what we put out is what the zero option was, which got it down to 8% of $70,000. 14% up to $210,000. and a m
. america reelected barack obama to get the economy moving. history will judge him as a good president or not if he's able to get the economy moving. but i want to point one thing out tos a i've said before, this is the new barack obama 2.0. he's taking his he is message to the american people. he will not sit around and let the republicans litigate and relitigate things or let the chattering class of washington determine his destiny. he'll rally support and put the pressure on all of congress, not just the republicans, but democrats, as well. >> is that the freedom that a second term president gets, right? >> well, it's the freedom when you try to work with the republicans and frankly some of the democrats, as well. you can't blame all the republicans. some of the democrats didn't want to move on the entitlement issues and they'll have to move. so this is obama 2.0. a much more engaged, a much more activist president. you series bringing a business community in, community leaders, small business, not for profit. he'll be much more engaged in this second term. >> morris, on this issue,
on hits to latin america. and adp to paris is lowering its growth target for 2015 as lower traffic .lower economic projections since the summer are now affecting its prospects, down 6%. so, again, whether it's a fiscal cliff or generally speaking with, the message this morning is fairly weak. take a look at the bond space note. moving into gilts, moving out of italy and spain, but as we've been saying, 4.5% or under that and about 5.3% for spain aren't bad considering. t thor row/dollar is weaker. most of the risk currencies are moving lower. euro/dollar down by .3%. sterling is weaker against the dollar. we're seeing the dollar generally up. the dollar/yen here up .4% for the yen. so we've seen some significant weakening as the bank of japan trying to combat deflation. but today, a pause in that move. joining us now with plenty more on the asian trade, diedra. >> it's not the end of the world, but it is pretty ugly out here in asia. markets were headed towards some gains today and then all of a sudden we did get that fiscal cliff set back. the nikkei 225 dropping a percent. you can see t
. and people have been saying right now that america needs to do what britain has been doing. and maybe there's a case for that. but nonetheless, if britain has a parliamentary system, we have a very different kind of political system. so america isn't going to rewrite itself just to adapt to this particular political situation. but look, something has changed in the politics of america. right now, george h.w. bush is very ill. he may pass on in the next couple of weeks or so. when he does, that will be the passing of the last truly national president. look at how he was elected in 1998. he won traditionally democratic as well as republican states. he was a moderate guy, a war hero. he was respected by people across the aisle. that was the last time in history you'll see that. >> that it is, president obama got a lot of votes in 2008 by a lot of votes that were not just -- >> that is so. but clinton did quite well but only because ross perot was running. very complicated. in terms of it being a national figure, someone reaching across the aisle, you haven't seen that. one of the things that h
sentiment in america. and even george marshall, who was chief military advisor to franklin roosevelt said, how can we send all these weapons to england if they're going to surrender to the british in a matter of weeks, and we end up fighting the germans? we will be charging into the face of our own weapons. but even though the operation was secret, it became headlines of course when it happened around the world. and everyone knew about it. and roosevelt and marshall were very, very effected by this. they thought if the british government can do this, they are serious. they are not going to negotiate with the germans. they're going to stay in this for as long as they possibly can. and it opened up the pathway for armaments to go to britain, which were very much needed and very much appreciated. >> brooke stoddard, when the official date of the so-called battle for britain, battle of britain? >> when were they? i think britain calls it july to the end of september, let's say. >> of 1940, which is essentially -- >> that's right. >> the segment of your book, final question. let people read ot
angling for a greater share the mobile market but will they pay pc prices? melissa: america's opinion of the least trustworthy profession. that is just ahead. >> i'm robert gray with your fox business brief. stocks moving lower as investors remain focused on washington and the fiscal cliff negotiation. right now the dow is near the lows of the session, off by 52 points. >>> fifth and pacific named former kenneth cole cole chief executive paul blum to lead the juicy couture brand. he takes over as ceo effective immediately. the company in october lowered the full-year forecast and blamed the short fall on sagging sales at juicy. selling its computers is services to equifax for a billion dollars in cash. csc faced several challenges over the past year including a dispute over its contract to provide electronic patient records for britain's national health service. that is the latest from the fox business network, giving you the power to prosper lori: in congress we trust? not so much. new "gallup poll" shows half of americans, 54% have a low or very low opinion of congressional honesty
of a handful of restaurants right here in america that serves patrons bugs. on purpose. chilli pepper seasoned crickets. even scorpions on shrimp toast. >> scorpions still have the stinger in them, but they are dried, so the poison is neutralized. >> scorpions are just one of 1700 bugs that are safe for people to consume. it's still a novelty here in the states, but insects are part of a daily diet in most of the world. earlier this year the united nations held a global conference on the benefits of eating insects. even suggesting it might be a good solution to world hunger. >> i don't know why the united states doesn't eat insects when they're actually very healthy for you. >> reporter: he is right. insects are high in protein, low in fat and cholesterol. take a cricket, for example. a six ounce serving of these crunchy bugs have 60% less saturated fat as the same amount of ground beef. >> now the ants. >> these string potatoes aren't complete without adding some dried ants. >> they taste a little sour, tangy, and they have a hint of black pepper to them. >> reporter: they also have 14 grams
americas one of the most famous apt slavery advocate. famous as a radical ab list in nist. he was perceived to be that way because of a series of features he had given. lincoln on the other hand because he didn't have a national record could convincingly portray himself as the least radical the least antislavery republican. who is up for the race. so they go in and sue ward doesn't just have the advantage of being the dominant republican and being the governor and senator from new york. he also have -- weed is the name. fan fastic name. it's like tom wolf. perfectly portrays hawaii, you know, nature. he's the fine -- mid 19th merge has to offer he has essentially financial resources in the darings when table could involve cash as well as anything else you imagine. that doesn't happen. of course not. enormous advantages. he's been to many conventions. he dominated most. he goes there in fact sue ward was not the republican nominee in 1856 they told him there was no way we were winning. you don't want to be the leader of losing cost. let's wait four years and we'll win. he read the politics r
predict america will go back into a recession. >> here's what will happen starting tomorrow. income taxes would increase $2,400 a year for families with an annual income of $50,000 to $75,000. their social security taxes would also go up on average $1,000 a year. and some 2 million jobless americans stand to lose their fed caleral unemployment benefits. in all, the congressional budget office says going over the cliff could cost the country more than 3 million jobs in 2013. we begin our coverage with nancy cordes on capitol hill. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the senate is set to reconvene in about an hour. we're told negotiations progressed well last night, that the vice president is now heavily involved and that the two sides have moved significantly towards one another on the top issue, which is tax cuts. but the big question is whether they can make it the rest of the way before tonight's deadline. senators filled the halls sunday hoping they'd have a deal to vote on, but just before 6:00, the senate leader sent them home. >> there's still significan
? >> this is a normal process. new destinations for lastin america, korean nations, they have been improving in the last year or so. so that doesn't mean that europe is not -- europe is still the destination destination worldwide. >> ohio does it work out on the global net? i'm wondering whether the pie getting bigger has meant the european number stays the same. >> europe is still increasing, but now we have to -- >> it's getting bigger. >> exactly. >> right. okay. so we're not losing out. >> it's just interesting that the euro not being weaker is the largest issue regarding tourism. it doesn't look like that's in the cards. >> a weak euro is very good for our overseas travelers. they're coming to europe and especially the usa and canada are troubled a lot. which is very, very good. >> where is the money coming from? >> the usa and canada, we will now have to focus in brazil and china, which are emerging economies. >> and, james, do you find it at all encouraging if there's a balancing away from the european sector in europe? is it something that needs to happen or is it still going to remain on positi
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